Jordan Brand partners with local store owner and nonprofits to help local kids ahead of shoe release

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The release of a Michael Jordan shoe is always like a vacation for sneakerheads, but for the latest release of the Rebellionaire AJ1 coming on Saturday, it’s extra special for Queen City. “I was born in Cincinnati, grew up in Covington and went to NKU and really connected in Portland, Oregon and started working for Nike in 2011,” Eric Sandy said. , Jordan Brand Color Design Director. Sandy oversees all of AJ1. and retro brand. He is responsible for the works of art that many of these children will soon be sporting on their feet. For him and others, it’s more than a shoe. “When you come from a small town or a small town like Cincinnati, if you have a talent or a story, I think it should be your job to share it with people and be able to come back and represent in sort of what’s possible,” Sandy said. It was an opportunity for Corporate store owner Matt Tomamichael to get the community involved. “We were chosen as one of the locations to showcase the shoe ahead of the national release,” said Tomamichel. the shoe’s release was meant to showcase talent here in Cincinnati and show local kids that they can be more than they know. This week, five local nonprofits – Cincinnati Youth Collaborative, Saturday Hoops, Bigger Than Sneakers, Girls Health Period and Sole Bros received thousands of community donated items as part of the Can’t Stop Cincy project. Future fashion designer, Niaa Lawrence, left inspired. “Leaving here, I feel very, very safe in my dreams and I’m taking it day by day. It’s all about trust and being with the right people,” said Lawrence, a senior at North College Hill. The Rebellionaire AJ1 will be released Saturday at 8am for VIPs until 2pm then first come, first served.

The release of a Michael Jordan shoe is always like a vacation for sneakerheads, but for the latest release of the Rebellionaire AJ1 coming on Saturday, it’s extra special for Queen City.

“I was born in Cincinnati, raised in Covington and went to NKU and just signed on in Portland, Oregon and started working for Nike in 2011,” Eric said. Sandy, Jordan Brand Color Design Director.

Sandy oversees everything AJ1 and Retro Brand. He is responsible for the works of art that many of these children will soon be sporting on their feet. For him and others, it’s more than a shoe.

“When you come from a small town or a small town like Cincinnati, if you have a talent or a story, I think it should be your job to share it with people and be able to come back and represent in sort of what’s possible,” says Sandy.

It was an opportunity for Matt Tomamichael, owner of the corporate store, to involve the community.

“We were chosen as one of the locations to showcase the shoe ahead of the national release,” said Tomamichel.

For him, this week leading up to the shoe’s release was all about showcasing talent here in Cincinnati and showing local kids that they can be more than they know.

This week, five local nonprofits – Cincinnati Youth Collaborative, Saturday Hoops, Bigger Than Sneakers, Girls Health Period and Sole Bros received thousands of community donated items as part of the Can’t Stop Cincy project.

Future fashion designer, Niaa Lawrence left inspired.

“Leaving here, I feel very, very safe in my dreams and I’m taking it day by day. It’s all about trust and being with the right people,” said Lawrence, a senior at North College Hill.

The Rebellionaire AJ1 will be released on Saturday at 8 a.m. for VIPs until 2 p.m. and then on a first-come, first-served basis.


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